I’ve made some more user interface developments f or my interactive museum app. Below is screen 3, 4 and 5 out of eight screens. I wanted to vector each sweet image but this was going to take longer within the time frame we where given, so I settled for ‘Live trace’ in Illustrator to show how my vector sweets could look. I’m happy with how the app is looking so far. Enjoy!

Hull Streetlife Museum Interface Development

Screen 3: The sweet shop window

Hull Streetlife Museum Interface Development

Screen 4: Inside the shop, wall of shelf 1

Hull Streetlife Museum Interface Development

Screen 4: Inside the shop, wall of shelf 2

Advertisements

I’ve been working on my museum apps user interface design tonight. I’ve managed to vector the a basic design for first screen of the app which is the front of G. Stevens sweet shop. I added a glowing effect to the door for a user to know that it is click-able.

Hull Streetlife Museum Interface Development

Hull Streetlife Museum Interface Development

I also made tracks on the welcome page (screen 2) which introduces a user to the museum app. I wrote up some words to make the interface look realistic and informative as best I could without ‘banging on’ to bore the user.

I think I’ve made a good start with designing it so far. I know that once all the screens have been designed, I will be able to make adjustments such as choosing the right typefaces throughout, refining the colour scheme and overall attractiveness to the interface.

Thanks for reading – stay tuned for more progress! :)

 

I spent all last night drawing up my museum interactive iPad app ideas. Here are photos of my storyboard to see what my interactive experience involves. Like my earlier YCN post I will caption each photo to explain my app idea.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

A user opens the Hull Streetlife museum app for G. Stevens sweet shop and is shown an illustrated front of the shop. The door to the shop will have some sort of glow to it to show that it can be tapped to enter the shop.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

After entering the virtual sweet shop, a user is greeted with a welcome screen that explains what the museum app is about. A rough explanation is that a user visits various sections of the shop and adds their favourite sweet to their ‘sweetbag’ and at the end of the virtual tour a user will see a gallery of all the items they have added and learn some information they might not have known.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

This is the first screen of the front shop window where a user can explore what kind of sweets were sold in the shop. The idea is that every item can be added to a users virtual shopping cart (their sweet bag) if they add it. When a user is satisfied they will carry onto the next section of the shop.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

The next section is the inside of the shop where sweets are displayed on shelves with matching lime green wood panelling that’s in the original shop. The user is shown different sweets in jars and will pick however many sweets take their fancy.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

The next screen is the adjacent side of inside the sweet shop and is similar with the shelves and and lime painted wood but with different sweets a user can choose from.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

This is the last section of the virtual tour and is the front counter section where various chocolate bars are placed. A user will select however many bars of chocolate and then get to review what they got in the next screen. The sweet bag will begin to glow to show that it can now be clicked which takes the user to the next screen.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

This screen will appear which will show a visual gallery of all the sweets a user added to their sweet bag. On this screen a user can tap on each picture to obtain information about the sweet or something relating to G. Stevens shop.

Interactive Museum App Storyboard Idea

This is a screen that will pop up when an image in the gallery is clicked. The pop up box will show the sweet bigger, useful information and maybe also a joke or random fact to add more fun into the museum app.

And there we have it, hopefully you can get an understanding of how my museum app will work. Some things will probably be changed during my development such as text to say what to do on each screen for example.

Finally, I found some useful information about designing graphics for an iPad. Apparently my design dimensions should be 1024×768 at 72 dpi. So i’m now going to start to illustrate each screen as my target audience will be aimed at KS2 children such as some who can read ok and some who are still learning so images and some text should balance things out for that target audience.

Thanks for reading as always! :)

I’ve been looking for an iPad screen template that I can show how my museum app will look like in a real working tablet situation. After a good search I have come across the ‘iPad GUI PSD (Retina Display)’ by  Teehan+Lax which is such a great psd template that is full of custom options to really personalise the experience of showing just exactly what your iPad app will look like for real.

iPad screen psd template with retina display

iPad screen psd template with retina display

I really cant wait to be at the stage where I am showing what my museum app will look like! The next stage for me is to create a solid storyboard of how my app will work and to identify what will be interactive for users to enjoy and learn as they use the iPad app.

Stay tuned for my development :)

ipad interactive screen gestures

Touch screen gestures are used in Apple devices such as the iPhone and iPad. These simple touch gestures allow users to browse and flick through pages of content effortlessly and fast. These gestures are something I need to consider when designing my Hull Street-life museum iPad app of the G. Stevens sweet shop!

I have thought of a few loose ideas that some of the touch screen gestures could be implemented such as; the ‘Tap and Hold‘ gesture could be used when a user wants to fill up their sweet weighing scales when they find out how much it would have cost years ago for example.

Another gesture that could be used is the ‘Pinch‘ that could be used to zoom out of a close up part of the app on a particular sweet. The function would be like a ‘go back’ gesture.

I entered the 2012/2013 YCN Student Award competition with an entry for the UGG Australia brief.The brief was to give permission for men to buy UGG boots. This blog post is PART TWO (view part one here!) and is going to be another visual journey of some of my work I produced for this project. This blog post will cover 2 stages – Further development and my final design. I will caption my photos again to help you understand more of the project.

I hope you enjoy looking and reading my work – lets go!

Stage 3: Further Development

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

Experimenting with compositions of my vector repeated pattern for the UGG Boot range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

More experimenting with compositions of my vector repeated pattern for the UGG Boot range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

Experimenting with compositions of my vector repeated pattern for the UGG Casual range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

More experimenting with compositions of my vector repeated pattern for the UGG Casual range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

Experimenting with compositions of my vector repeated pattern for the UGG At Home range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

More experimenting with compositions of my vector repeated pattern for the UGG At Home range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

With the correct size of my repeated pattern designs I started to work on applying them to an A4 sized poster

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

I then added each shoe into my poster design and experimented with adding a drop shadow on each boot or not

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

While finishing the posters I received feedback that the ‘At Home’ repeat pattern wasn’t working with the original colours so I used a different colour choice to brighten the design up

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

With more feedback it was best to change the vector newspaper to a mug of tea/coffee as the scaling of the newspaper wasn’t working quite right. The new addition balances the overall design

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

I started to develop a 3D shopping bag that where the repeat pattern could also be added. I experimented with different compositions for the pattern to sit

Stage 4: Final Designs

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

Here is the final shopping bag design that would be used with the correct UGG shoe range upon purchase

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

Here is the final shoe box design to store the correct UGG shoe range inside.

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

An overview of all three design pieces that use the repeated pattern for the UGG Boot range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

An overview of all three design pieces that use the repeated pattern for the UGG Casual range

Adam Nelson / YCN Student Award Entry 2013 / UGG Australia

An overview of all three design pieces that use the repeated pattern for the UGG At Home range

And that brings you to the end of my YCN project for UGG Australia. I hope you enjoyed my two posts covering my design work. I am really happy and proud of the work I produced for the project! The icing on the top would be to win a YCN award which if I do, you’ll know straight about it. Wish me luck and thanks again for reading!